Inventing Anna, Repurposing Content, Robodogs for a Cause

Now, the iconic music and cultural journalist Danyel Smith (Former EIC of VIBE, Billboard, contributor to ESPN, The Undefeated and more) has seemingly reverse engineered her Black Girl Songbook podcast on Spotify, into the upcoming book Shine Bright, A Personal History of Black Women in Pop.
Inventing Anna, Repurposing Content, Robodogs for a Cause

Krista's Newsletter 006

Hope everyone had a nice Valentines or Galentine's Day. Lots of good creator economy stuff to get into this week, so let's do it.

TL;DR In this issue:

-Legendary music journalist Danyel Smith's remixes her podcast into a book.

-NBA All-Star game sponsor Kia leverages the metaverse to encourage pet adoption.

-1-minute Coaching Session: Where do you want to go?

-What I'm Into: Netflix series on fake German heiress Anna Delvey.

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Would you please take a second and answer my one-question survey at the end? Thank you! ks

Content gets repurposed and monetized every day, right? Premium podcast The Shrink Next Door became an Apple TV series. The Dirty John true crime podcast became a Showtime series. Issa Rae's YouTube comedy series Awkward Black Girl", was morphed into the Emmy-winning  "Insecure" on HBO.  

Now, the iconic music and cultural journalist Danyel Smith (Former EIC of VIBE, Billboard, contributor to ESPN, The Undefeated and more) has seemingly reverse engineered her Black Girl Songbook podcast on Spotify, into the upcoming book Shine Bright, A Personal History of Black Women in Pop. The book is a companion piece inspired by her podcast, but interspersed with her own personal memories and reflections.  The show and the book serve to give artists from Ciera to H.E.R. to Whitney Houston a thoughtful complete profile and introspection.

My point in all this is to encourage you as content creators to repurpose your content without any reservation. There seems to be a limiting belief among us content creators that if they repurpose a piece of content they will come off as repetitious or lacking creativity. No, no, and no again. Why?

1.  Everyone doesn't follow every platform.

2. People have their own preferences for content consumption. (audiobooks vs     Kindle vs hardcopy)

3. Can you break your content down into "snack size" pieces to spark interest from potential followers? Think: Instagram stories/reels, TikTok etc.

Oh, almost forgot to mention, though Smith's book doesn't come out until  April, it's already been named one of the 50 Most Anticipated Books of 2022 by Oprah magazine.


"Gangster" Content Strategy of the week

Kia's "Robo Dog" NFT

Kia Automobiles dropped their first ever NFT project, Robo Dogs. in conjunction with 2022 NBA All-Star Weekend.  10,000 of the unique pups were included in the drop, with a starting floor of $20.22USD. What was cool to me about this activation is that 90% of the proceeds from each sale go to The Petfinder Foundation,  a non-profit that helps with adoption of rescue pets.  If you're interested in buying an NFT for a cause, visit the Sweet.io NFT Marketplace.


⏱1-Minute coaching session

Where do you want to go with your content creation business?

I sometimes ask clients  if they could wave a magic wand, and have their ideal business with ideal customers, what would that look like?  I think so many times as content creators and entrepreneurs, we can drift into focusing more on what we don't want- less-than-ideal customers, technical problems, courses, certifications, - instead of what we do want. What I find is, when you shift your focus towards your vision for your business, your mindset and motivation grow exponentially.

Am I suggesting you have to be corny and act like you have no problems? Of course not. What I am asking you to consider doing is asking yourself when the last time was you wrote your vision and your goals down, and when was the last time you looked at them? Let me know in the comments.


What I’m into this week

photo via New York Times. Photographer: Steven Hirsch

I, like the rest of America, am obsessed with Netflix's Inventing Anna, the mini-series starring Julia Garner about the 'Fake German Heiress' Anna Delvey ,above, who scammed Manhattan's social elite, major banks, 5-star hotels, and even concierges to the tune of around half a million dollars. After getting caught and charged with all kinds of fraud, had the nerve to retain a stylist to supply her with a fresh designer outfit each day of her trial.

I think what keeps everyone so intrigued (including me) is: how in the world did she pull this off? My observations: (I am in no way condoning any of her actions.)

  1. As liars are prone to do, I think she told this lie about her background and financial status so many times, she actually believed it, making it easier to "sell" to others.
  2. She laid the foundation her image on social media over time to reinforce the lie. Delvey's instagram was loaded with pics of her with all the right people, at all the hipster clubs/restaurants/vacation spots, and with all the designer things.
  3. She saw her targets coming a mile away. Grifters are extremely adept at reading people, and knowing who they can get over on. If the series is to be believed,

That's it for this week...good luck and let me know how I can help you.--KS

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