90s Hip Hop, Corgis, and Playlists for Podcasts

90s Hip Hop, Corgis, and Playlists for Podcasts

Influencerbrands

In the 90s, many hip hop artists grew tired of shouting out luxury brands on their records and wearing them on stage - Gucci, Tommy Hilfiger, Louis Vuitton, Moet & Chandon champagne, and getting no money for it


Krista’s Newsletter #008

TL;DR

  • Trends: Influencers Launch Brands Like 90s Hip Hop Artists
  • Gangster Marketing Strategy:  Playlists for Podcasts
  • 1-Minute Coaching Session:
  • What I’m Into This Week




📰 Trends

Grand Puba of Brand Nubians with Tommy Hilfiger (photo by Up North Trips)
“Girbauds hanging baggy/ Tommy Hilfiger top gear.” - Grand Puba, on Mary J. Blige’s What’s the 411?

In the 90s, many hip hop artists grew tired of shouting out luxury brands on their records and wearing them on stage - Gucci, Tommy Hilfiger, Louis Vuitton, Moet & Chandon champagne,  and getting no money for it, while seeing those brands get awareness and sales boosts for free. They then plowed that frustration into entrepreneurship, and soon there were fashion brands launched everywhere:  Sean John by Puff Daddy, Shady by Eminem, Wu Wear (you know who owns that), Fetish by Eve, etc.

Fast-forward to 2022, and some social media influencers are ditching endorsement deals to launch their own products, like Bryan Reisberg, who runs an Instagram account for his pet Corgi, Maxine, aka Maxine the Fluffy Corgi.

Bryan Reisberg, with Maxine the Fluffy Corgi, in her Little Chonk backpack

(If you’re tempted to snicker right here, I need to tell you Maxine has 871K followers.) Taking Maxine on the subway in NYC was a challenge because the MTA rules require pets to be in a carrier, and the Corgi build isn’t quite conducive to the usual pet carrier. Reisberg used one of the basic rules of business ideation - solve one of your own problems - and the Little Chonk Pet Backpack was born. Both drops of the backpacks sold out within minutes.

Maxine hasn’t yet made herself available to the press for comment.


😎 Gangster Marketing Strategy: Engagement with Custom Playlists

I should be all over this because I dearly love making playlists.  Josh Spector of For the Interested sent a playlist of his favorite marketing podcast episodes to his followers. “An easy way to create a valuable resource for your existing audience and attract new people:

Curate a playlist of individual podcast episodes they'll find helpful on a specific topic.” Spector says. “#WhyDidn’tIThinkofThat?  You can find Josh Spector's podcast playlist here.

⏰ One-Minute Coaching Session - 240 characters not enough? Try threads

I’ve noticed a lot of content creators are using Twitter’s thread feature to share content and get past the 240 character minimum.

One example is Naima Cochrane aka Naima Supreme on Twitter. For many years she did #SundaySermon, where she created amazing Twitter threads with video, and did Behind the Music-level deep dives on musical artists, genres, and eras. It was wildly popular, funny, and informative. Here’s one of the last “sermons” on Diddy vs Jermaine Dupri.

Takeaways

  • Be cohesive. Tell a story, stick to one topic, or do a mini-tutorial.
  • Stuck for topics? Reach out to your followers/fans/subscribers and ask what they want to know about.

😎What I’m into this week

🎧 Listening: Illmatic-Nas. I admit I was late to the party on Nas. Other than One Mic, his music just didn’t grab me when he was in his heyday. Since he’s in heavy rotation of late, thanks to the latest Tiffany's TV spot, I decided to give Illmatic another listen.
📚 Reading: Red Lip Theology by Candice Marie Benbow
📺 Watching: Showtime’s Super Pumped, the story of Uber founder Travis Kalanick
@ Following: Linh Nguyen @l4nguyen Senior Advisor to Run AAPI, an AAPI advocacy group.

That’s it for this week. If I can help you at all with content marketing advice, please get in touch.